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Name Art no Species Reactivity Application Conjugation Size Price
BioSite-3DP-1002
PCR
1 unit
298-14400
PCR
50 preparations
S201
PCR
500 µL
R-1002-1
PCR
400 Reactions
298-EP31400
bacteria
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM31400
bacteria
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP31700
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM31700
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM29200
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP36700
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-28009
PCR
500 reactions
298-TM41000
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM39300
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP41000
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM32600
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP34800
invertebrates
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM34800
invertebrates
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP37200
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM33100
bacteria
PCR
24 reactions
298-28007
PCR
100 Reactions
298-TM36300
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM37200
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP29200
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM36500
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP36300
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM32400
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM36700
virus
PCR
24 reactions
BioSite-C2008
PCR
2 plates
298-EP39300
virus
PCR
24 Reactions
298-EP36500
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP32600
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP32400
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP33100
bacteria
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM42500
bacteria
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP52000
invertebrates
PCR
24 reactions
298-DxTM32600
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM29400
fungi
PCR
24 reactions
BIO-25054
PCR
1 x 250 reactions
298-TM34000
fungi
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM32100
bacteria
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP33200
bacteria
PCR
24 reactions
298-DxTM36700
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM35100
bacteria
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP34000
fungi
PCR
24 reactions
298-DxTM33100
bacteria
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM30400
bacteria
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM61800
horse/equine
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM42000
virus
PCR
24 reactions
298-EP64400
PCR
24 reactions
298-TM52000
invertebrates
PCR
24 reactions

Gene Expression Analysis: RNA-Seq or Real-Time PCR?

If you’ve been following our blog posts over the last few months, you’ll have noticed our series on RNA-seq and real-time PCR. Although the underlying principles behind these two techniques are different, both can provide information about the amount (absolute or relative) of mRNA isolated from any sample type.

Multiplex Real-Time PCR for Beginners

In case the name doesn’t give it away, multiplex real-time PCR involves amplifying multiple DNA or RNA targets simultaneously in a single PCR reaction. This requires the presence of a specific pair of primers and a complementary DNA-binding probe for each target under study.

The Lowdown on Real-Time PCR – Part 2

Welcome to part 2 of our real-time PCR series. In part 1, we went through the basics of real-time PCR, its advantages over end-point PCR, a typical workflow, data output, and the choice of fluorescent labeling systems available.

In part 2, we take a look at the different quantification methods available, setup tips, primer design and quality control.

The Lowdown on Real-Time PCR – Part 1

In case the name doesn’t give it away, real-time PCR is a PCR application that monitors DNA amplification in real time. This means that amplification is monitored during the PCR reaction, and not at the end of the reaction as with end-point PCR, where PCR products are typically analyzed post-run on agarose gels.

No PCR Product! What Now?

Since its invention in the 1980’s, PCR has become a cornerstone technique in molecular biology, with research applications ranging from cloning to gene expression analysis, and clinical applications including genotyping and infectious disease diagnosis. PCR is great when it works, but can be painful to troubleshoot when it doesn’t. Although PCR reactions that yield low amounts of amplicon, off-target amplicons, and/or primer dimers won’t leave you jumping for joy when you run your gel, the most painful PCR reaction outcome is one that produces no band at all! Here are our top tips to help you troubleshoot a no-band PCR.

Introducing the First Comprehensive 16S NGS Kit for Microbiomics

16S rRNA sequencing has become the standard technique for microbial community composition profiling. Compared to shotgun metagenomics sequencing, 16S rRNA sequencing is more cost-effective and robust, generally requires less input DNA and is less impacted by the presence of host DNA.