Funakoshi for Cancer Research : Anti-Human Lumican Antibody

news June 08 2017

For clear staining of human lumican in Immunohistochemistry (IHC) – Anti-Human Lumican Rabbit-Poly

Lumican is a glycoprotein, consists of 338 amino acids and isa member of small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family. Lumican contains tandem leucine-rich repeat regionand its central region plays a role in N-linked glycosylation. It has been reported that overexpression of lumican is related to skin cancer, breast cancer, pancreas cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer, malignant melanoma and bone cancer.

Funakoshi’s anti-human lumican rabbit-poly can stain tumor part and stromal componentin cancer tissues sharply. This product is commercialized by theresearch result of Departments of Pathology and Integrative Oncological Pathology, Nippon Medical School.

Specifications
Immunogen : Synthetic peptide of Human Lumican aa 211-227
Host: Rabbit
Crossreactivity: Human and Rat
Format: Affinity Purified
Product Form: Phosphate buffered saline (10mM Phosphate buffer, 0.15M NaCl (pH7.2))(0.3mg/ml)
Preservative: 0.1% Sodium Azide
Quantity: 25 μL
Application: Immunohistochemistry (FFPE ; Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded tissue) and Western Blot

Lumican expression is detected in cytoplasm of cancer cells at epidermis.

Product Name Size Cat. No. Storage
Anti-Lumican, Human, Rabbit-Poly 25µl 181-FDV-0001 -20℃
Fig. 1 IHC data of human pancreas cancer tissue (FFPE) Fig.2 IHC data ofhuman lung cancer tissue (FFPE). Lumican can be detected in cancer cell (Left) or stromal component (Right) at squamous cell cancer. Fig.3 Western Blotting data of A549 cell lysate. Core protein (~37 kDa) and other bands can be detected by difference of glycosylation.
Fig.4 IHC data from tissue sample of Bowen’s disease patient. Lumican expression is detected in cytoplasm of cancer cells at epidermis. Fig.5 IHC data from tissue sample of hidroacanthoma simplex.
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